Difference between revisions of "Blackbury"

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'''Blackbury''' is the fictional town where the [[:category:Johnny Maxwell Series|Johnny Maxwell Series]] books take place. Judging by the BBC TV adaption it is not far from Manchester.
'''Blackbury''' is the fictional town where the [[:category:Johnny Maxwell Series|Johnny Maxwell Series]] books take place. Judging by the BBC TV adaption it is not far from Manchester.


It is also the location of the [[Arnold Bros (est. 1905)]] department store (demolished and replaced by the Arnco Leisure Centre). It is also referred to in later books of the ''[[Bromeliad]]'' (''[[Truckers]]'' trilogy, which gives the town's name as [[Grimethorpe]], but does mention the Neil Armstrong Shopping Mall).
It is also the location of the [[Arnold Bros (est. 1905)]] department store (demolished and replaced by the Arnco Leisure Centre). It is also referred to in later books of the ''[[Bromeliad]]'' (''[[Truckers]]'' trilogy, which gives the town's name as [[Grimethorpe]], but does mention the Neil Armstrong Shopping Mall).  Several of the stories in ''[[:book:Dragons_At_Crumbling_Castle|Dragons At Crumbling Castle]]'' take place in Blackbury.


==Notable places==
==Notable places==

Revision as of 16:32, 8 September 2015

Blackbury is the fictional town where the Johnny Maxwell Series books take place. Judging by the BBC TV adaption it is not far from Manchester.

It is also the location of the Arnold Bros (est. 1905) department store (demolished and replaced by the Arnco Leisure Centre). It is also referred to in later books of the Bromeliad (Truckers trilogy, which gives the town's name as Grimethorpe, but does mention the Neil Armstrong Shopping Mall). Several of the stories in Dragons At Crumbling Castle take place in Blackbury.

Notable places

Annotation

Towns "not far from Manchester":- Blackburn; Bury. Please note that in colloquial British English the e in the word berry is a schwa, hence "blackberry" (the fruit, Rubus fruticosus, not the computerised whatnot) is pronounced "blackbury" or "blackb'ry" by most British people.