Difference between revisions of "Ur-Gilash"

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Formerly the dominant [[God]] in the region which is now [[Omnia]]. He was successfully challenged and overthrown by [[Om]], who in his diminished state as a tortoise was not at all happy to meet him again in the desert. Not because Ur-Gilash harboured any thoughts of revenge, he was long past that state. But because encountering a disembodied whispering voice on the wind mumbling madly and deleriously about past glories reminded Om that diminished though his existence was, there was a long way to fall yet, and an even worse state he could be in. This was practical proof of "Charcoal" [[Abraxas]]' theory about the rise and fall, especially the fall, of gods.  
Formerly the dominant [[God]] in the region which is now [[Omnia]]. He was successfully challenged and overthrown by [[Om]], who in his diminished state as a tortoise was not at all happy to meet him again in the desert. Not because Ur-Gilash harboured any thoughts of revenge, he was long past that state. But because encountering a disembodied whispering voice on the wind mumbling madly and deliriously about past glories reminded Om that diminished though his existence was, there was a long way to fall yet, and an even worse state he could be in. This was practical proof of "Charcoal" [[Abraxas]]' theory about the rise and fall, especially the fall, of gods.  
 
 


[[Category:Discworld characters]]
[[Category:Discworld characters]]
[[Category:Supernatural entities]]
[[Category:Supernatural entities]]
[[de:Ur-Gilasch]]
[[de:Ur-Gilasch]]

Latest revision as of 16:02, 6 April 2014

Formerly the dominant God in the region which is now Omnia. He was successfully challenged and overthrown by Om, who in his diminished state as a tortoise was not at all happy to meet him again in the desert. Not because Ur-Gilash harboured any thoughts of revenge, he was long past that state. But because encountering a disembodied whispering voice on the wind mumbling madly and deliriously about past glories reminded Om that diminished though his existence was, there was a long way to fall yet, and an even worse state he could be in. This was practical proof of "Charcoal" Abraxas' theory about the rise and fall, especially the fall, of gods.